3 Qualities of a Kids Ministry that Brings Families Back

kids ministryAccording to a recent Barna study, 42% of participants said that becoming a parent led them to reconnect with a church, become more active in the ministry, or get involved with a church for the first time. As families grow, many parents feel a responsibility to get serious about their faith and get their kids plugged into a church.

With children playing such an important role in the life of families, churches should also make kids a top priority. Does your kids ministry offer these three qualities and make your church family-friendly?

1. Invaluable 

Is your church preparing children to grow in Christ? The potential next generation of your ministry is currently sitting in nurseries and classrooms throughout your church. Take advantage of this opportunity to start them on the path toward discipleship at a young age. Don’t you still remember the Bible stories and Sunday school teachers from your childhood?

And remember to get creative and stay as current as possible. The tactics and teaching methods that worked 25 years ago might not work today. Flannel graphs and sticker books have their place, but most kids are now exposed to technology at a young age and will expect similar engagement from your church.

2. Fun

Children’s programs should not only provide spiritual and educational value—they should also be fun! With momentary attention spans, kids need stimulation after just a few minutes of listening to keep them interested and awake. Don’t be afraid to throw in a silly game or song to keep those youngsters happy and strike a healthy balance. Families will be interested in returning to your church if they know they’re kids are having a good time. In fact, the kids might actually ask!

3. Safe

Parents want their kids to learn and have fun, but their safety is even more important. Does your church run background checks? Do you use a secure check-in system? Do you effectively track medical conditions and guardian pick-up? Invest in a safe kids ministry to leave parents—especially visitors—confident in your church’s ability to keep their children safe and more likely to come back.

How does your church create a kids ministry that keeps families coming back?